Blood Sugar – Understanding the Effects of the Modern Diet on Blood Sugar Levels

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The typical modern diet and activity level creates regular occurrences of unhealthy blood sugar levels in your body.  Blood sugar is a term used to describe the amount of the sugar glucose that is in currently in your blood.  Glucose is the primary sugar, or carbohydrate, in your body.

When you eat food, nutrients are absorbed from your food by your digestive system.  They are then transmitted to all of your bodies’ tissues through your blood.  Your body uses a series of mechanisms to keep the concentration of sugar (and other substances) in your blood within certain ranges.

Certain organs, such as your brain, run almost exclusively on glucose.  So your body keeps blood sugar levels from dropping below a certain threshold, or level.  However, your body also strives to keep glucose from rising to levels that are too high.  See a chart of the range where your body keeps your blood sugar levels here. 

High Blood Sugar Levels

Clinically, constant spikes in your blood sugar damage your body.  There are both short-term and long-term effects of high blood sugar.  A single, sharp rise in blood sugar will create a large insulin release, preventing fat burning, promoting fat storage, and also will result in fatigue and fuzzy-headedness.  Constant, chronic high blood sugar levels are the defining characteristic of Type II Diabetes.

Related Resources:

Why Gourmet Cupcakes Are Evil

KidsHealth.org: When Blood Sugar Gets Too High

National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse: What is Diabetes?

Blood Sugar Stability

Reuters on Curbing Diabetes

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One thought on “Blood Sugar – Understanding the Effects of the Modern Diet on Blood Sugar Levels

  1. Pingback: Understanding: Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load | Bonfire

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