Intellectual Quotes

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  • “But what is happiness except the simple harmony between a man and the life he leads?”
Albert Camus.”
  • “Circumstances do not make a man, they reveal him.” Dr. Wayne W. Dyer
  • “Knowledge is power and enthusiasm pulls the switch.” Steve Droke
  • “The state of your life is nothing more than a reflection of your state of mind.” Dr. Wayne W. Dye
  • A primary method for gaining a mind full of peace is to practice emptying the mind.
  • “Your imagination is the preview to life’s coming attractions.” Albert Einstein
  • “Your inner-most dominant thoughts become your outer-most tangible reality.”  Dr. John Demartini
  • “The act of putting pen to paper encourages pause for thought…(helping) us regain our equilibrium.” – Norbet Platt
  • “A simple man believes anything, but a prudent man gives thought to his steps.” Proverbs 14:15
  • “No trumpets sound when the important decisions of our life are made. Destiny is made known silently.” ~ Agnes De Mille
  • “ It’s a sign of mediocrity when you demonstrate gratitude with moderation.” ~ Robert Benigni
  • “Let each become all that he was created capable of being.” ~ Thomas Carlyle
  • “Nothing contributes so much to tranquilize the mind as a steady purpose — a point on which the soul may fix its intellectual eye.
” ~ Mary Shelley

Intellectual Affirmations

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  • My life is an adventure worth recording.
  • Every choice that I make, makes me.
  • I choose to embrace the real me and am committed to being the best I can be in every facet in my life.
  • I know that challenge is opportunity in disguise.
  • Today I choose to be the master of my time.
  • Today I choose to fill my mind with only positive thoughts.

Roles and Goals: Define Who You Want To Be

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In setting ourselves up for success, we need to understand the element of control.  We all know that we cannot control everything in our lives.  At the same time, we understand that there are certain elements of our lives that we are able to control…and still others that only we can control.  The measure of control we execute on our limited resources of time, energy, and focus and where we spend them will provide a good indication of what type of results we will have over time.  If we neglect to manage what we can, the cares of life will certainly “manage” them for us.

Answering the following questions will help us define and establish our roles and goals in relation to each Life Time Value Account (and any more that they or their answers bring to mind).  The greater definition we add to who we are today and what we want going forward in each of these life areas, the easier it will be for us to allocate our finite resources toward each of them and move toward our desired lifestyles.

Physical
Since I understand that I am wholly and solely responsible for my own wellness lifestyle and the expression of my genes, what wellness milestones do I want to achieve in the next day, week, month, and year(s)?

Spiritual
What is my spiritual orientation (if any at all), and how does it impact/influence those around me?  Is there a particular level of spiritual awareness, (in)dependence, or capability that I want in life?

Financial
What of my financial matters do I have absolute control of, and which am I dependent on others (employer, government, etc.) for?  What is a practical target for the way I want my accounts to look at this time next month/year?

Intellectual
During my “discretional” time, what would I like to achieve in my own ongoing learning and education?  What concepts do I need more understanding in that I can work on gaining if I will allocate time and energy to them?  Is there any bad information getting into my mind that I can decide to move away from or filter out somehow?

Familial
What is my position within my family?  Am I primarily the leader, a contributor, or a subordinate, and how many people in my family do I need to balance my limited resources among?  How much and what must I invest into which members of my immediate and extended family to know that I have done as much as I possibly could to arrive at the family structure and relationships that I ultimately desire?  What do that structure and those relationships look like?

Vocational
At what point in my career am I, and how much control over and derived benefit from my own time and efforts do I have?  What would I like to change, and what measure of success would I like to achieve in the short-term?  In the long-term?  Do I want to get to a point that my vocation is less necessity-driven and more passion-driven?  What is that point, and what conditions would make it so for me?

Recreational/Social
Do I know how to enjoy life both when I am by myself and when I am with other people?  Who am I within my community of peers and acquaintances?  Is that who I ultimately want to be?  And if not, how would I define the person I’d like to be for them and the type of influence I’d like to have on those around me?

Taking time out to define where we stand in these areas of life and where we would like to be gives us a distinct advantage over anyone simply moving through life without giving attention to them – we can decide more of our own journey because of an increased awareness in the power of decision.  Let’s decide now to take that time, do that assessment, and line ourselves up for progress toward our desired lifestyle.