Physical Quotes

by admin
  • “When you are required to exhibit strength, it comes.” Joseph Campbell
  • A man too busy to take care of his health is like a mechanic too busy to take care of his tools. Spanish Proverb
  • A man’s health can be judged by which he takes two at a time – pills or stairs. Joan Welsh
  • “Those that cannot find time to exercise, will sooner or later have to find time to be sick.”  Lord E. Stanley
  • Bad habits are like a comfortable bed, easy to get into, but hard to get out of.
  •  “Human beings aren’t meant to operate like machines – at high speeds, continuously, for long periods of time. On the contrary, people perform best when they operate rhythmically – spending and renewing energy.” – Tony Schultze
  • “Make rest a necessity, not an objective.” – Jim Rohn
  • “Health is a state of harmony between the body, mind and spirit.  When one is free from physical distractions, the gates of the soul open.”  ~B.K.S. Iyenga
  • “… Many people surrender what is possible for what is comfortable.”  - Orrin Woodward
  • “Being defeated is only a temporary condition; giving up is what makes it permanent.” ~ Marilyn vos Savant
  • “When we are faced with a crisis or struggle we often despair. But it’s in this struggle that the best opportunities often emerge…” – Tony Schwartz

     

Physical Affirmations

by admin
  • Every investment you make in your health on the front end will return ten-fold in the long run.
  • Good habits build momentum. Today I will accelerate.
  • I am capable of anything I set my mind to.
  • I am eating, moving and thinking toward the life that I want.
  • I look, feel and act healthier every day.
  • I will choose to move today as if my life depends upon it….because it does.

Roles and Goals: Define Who You Want To Be

by admin

In setting ourselves up for success, we need to understand the element of control.  We all know that we cannot control everything in our lives.  At the same time, we understand that there are certain elements of our lives that we are able to control…and still others that only we can control.  The measure of control we execute on our limited resources of time, energy, and focus and where we spend them will provide a good indication of what type of results we will have over time.  If we neglect to manage what we can, the cares of life will certainly “manage” them for us.

Answering the following questions will help us define and establish our roles and goals in relation to each Life Time Value Account (and any more that they or their answers bring to mind).  The greater definition we add to who we are today and what we want going forward in each of these life areas, the easier it will be for us to allocate our finite resources toward each of them and move toward our desired lifestyles.

Physical
Since I understand that I am wholly and solely responsible for my own wellness lifestyle and the expression of my genes, what wellness milestones do I want to achieve in the next day, week, month, and year(s)?

Spiritual
What is my spiritual orientation (if any at all), and how does it impact/influence those around me?  Is there a particular level of spiritual awareness, (in)dependence, or capability that I want in life?

Financial
What of my financial matters do I have absolute control of, and which am I dependent on others (employer, government, etc.) for?  What is a practical target for the way I want my accounts to look at this time next month/year?

Intellectual
During my “discretional” time, what would I like to achieve in my own ongoing learning and education?  What concepts do I need more understanding in that I can work on gaining if I will allocate time and energy to them?  Is there any bad information getting into my mind that I can decide to move away from or filter out somehow?

Familial
What is my position within my family?  Am I primarily the leader, a contributor, or a subordinate, and how many people in my family do I need to balance my limited resources among?  How much and what must I invest into which members of my immediate and extended family to know that I have done as much as I possibly could to arrive at the family structure and relationships that I ultimately desire?  What do that structure and those relationships look like?

Vocational
At what point in my career am I, and how much control over and derived benefit from my own time and efforts do I have?  What would I like to change, and what measure of success would I like to achieve in the short-term?  In the long-term?  Do I want to get to a point that my vocation is less necessity-driven and more passion-driven?  What is that point, and what conditions would make it so for me?

Recreational/Social
Do I know how to enjoy life both when I am by myself and when I am with other people?  Who am I within my community of peers and acquaintances?  Is that who I ultimately want to be?  And if not, how would I define the person I’d like to be for them and the type of influence I’d like to have on those around me?

Taking time out to define where we stand in these areas of life and where we would like to be gives us a distinct advantage over anyone simply moving through life without giving attention to them – we can decide more of our own journey because of an increased awareness in the power of decision.  Let’s decide now to take that time, do that assessment, and line ourselves up for progress toward our desired lifestyle.