Why Flax Oil Doesn’t Cut It As A Supplier Of Omega-3

by drpaul

For many legitimate reasons, some people don’t want to or cannot take fish oil and have been lead to believe that flax oil is a viable alternative to achieve healthy levels of omega-3 essential fatty acids.

Flax oil contains the essential fatty acied alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) which through metabolic processes the body can convert to the omega-3 essential fatty acids eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) which are found in fish oil.

However, the conversion rate for this physiologic process is very limited – it is very low. So, flax oil is not an adequate substitute for fish oil.

Recently, algae-based omega-3 supplements have been developed that solve the problem for people seeking to supplement their diet with a plant-based omega-3 product. 



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